Sagrantino

Small Batch Wines  |  2009 Sagrantino

Vintage Notes:

2009 was a very low cropping vintage thanks to a heat wave during flowering. This caused a very low percentage of berries completing set, and thus impacting crops drastically, resulting in some fast ripening and very concentrated fruit. The Sagrantino grape is found traditionally in the town of Montefalco in Umbria, and as such, is used to plenty of heat. The berries have extremely thick skin, loads of rich tannins, a beautiful floral aroma and a great natural acid line. It is the inaugural release of Sagrantino under our small batch range and we hope you will enjoy it.

Reviews

  • www.intrepidwino.com, April 2013

    Core of sweet dark fruit on the nose, floral and intense. Quite dense but in no way oppressive or aggressive, earthy and full without heaviness. Slight savoury finish, needs food.

  • www.que-syrah.com, April 2013

    Sagrantino is an Italian variety from Montefalco in Umbria and many of you may have heard of it, however very few have seen it in Australia. Sagrantino has great adaptability to wine regions with windy, dry zones, with a preference for clayey-flinty soils- a perfect match for McLaren Vale vineyards around Seaview subregion.

    Don and Margaret Oliver (5th generation of Olivers Taranga) travelled to Montefalco in 2006, after planting Sagrantino a year or so earlier. Apprehensively, they asked the locals their opinion on this variety and like all good Italians they answered to give this vine ‘time’ and have ‘patience’, reassuring them that they wouldn’t be disappointed with the wait.

    Sagrantino is well known for being a tannic wine, due to the rich anthocyanins in the berry skins. Generally it should come with a warning on the label. That warning should be; “Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch’intrate” your gums and cheeks shall never be the same.

    So it was with trepidation that I started tasting the 2009 Oliver’s Taranga Sagrantino. It is a dark red ruby colour. On the nose it has a dark berry fruit, roast meat, almost soy /savoury character. With a delightful floral earthiness. The intensity of the aroma has you preparing your tastebuds. It has good acid, with dark morello cherries. And again that smoky chacuterie. I found it both herbal and spicy – a combination of dusty fennel seed, cardamom, sort of Indian spice. Both interesting and complex. This is definitely a full bodied wine, with quite a warm alcohol hit despite being 13.5%. While the tannins are abundant and grippy, they are fine and powdery in texture. What it lacks a little in length, it makes up for in upfront intensity.

    I tasted this over several days to see how it would develop. The grippy mouthfeel does soften a little, and that spicy character becomes more meaty. During the tasting I was contemplating what to eat with this. It definitely requires food, a rich meaty ragu with smoky pancetta may be a good match. Or potentially even grilled venison marinated in red wine and juniper berries – if you’re game and love to play.

    Alcohol 13.5%
    RRP $40
    Closure: Screwcap

  • Winestate Magazine March/April 2012- 3 stars

    Complex ripe berry aromas with a nutty herbal edge. Lovely fruit and velvety tannins on the palate.

  • Q Wine, March 2012

    Oliver's Taranga Sangrantino 2009, McLaren Vale: A great way to finish off the night with this heavy weight. This wine is the first vintage of Sangrantino made by the winery and it is a mighty fine effort. Violets, black fruits with a tiny herby touch, charred oak and a bucket load of tannin. A big chunk of pork will match perfectly.

    More can be found at http://qwineblog.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/alternative-variety-night.html

  • James Halliday 2012 Aust Wine Companion, 88 points

    This is a full-blooded version of sagrantino, very different to the Chalmers wine of the same vintage; here you can sense the approaching thunder of the tannins and the muscular, full-bodied black fruits

  • Rich & Lingering, Nov 2011

    Hey Shiraz, Say Hello to My Little Friend!

    Lets face it, winemakers love to play. New techniques in the winery, new varieties in the vineyard, new oak forests. It all makes the industry grow and develop. One of our favourite winemakers in McLaren Vale who has a range of new varieties is Oliver’s Taranga. Amongst the ‘small batch’ wines winemaker Corrina Wright loves to play with, are a range of alternative varieties; Fiano, Vermentino, and Sagrantino.

    Sagrantino is an Italian variety from Montefalco in Umbria and many of you may have heard of it, however very few have seen it in Australia. Sagrantino has great adaptability to wine regions with windy, dry zones, with a preference for clayey-flinty soils- a perfect match for McLaren Vale vineyards around Seaview subregion.

    Don and Margaret Oliver (5th Generation Olivers) travelled to Montefalco in 2006, after planting Sagrantino a year or so earlier. Apprehensively, they asked the locals their opinion on this variety and like all good Italians they answered to give this vine ‘time’ and have 'patience', reassuring them that they wouldn’t be disappointed with the wait.
    Sagrantino is well known for being a tannic wine, due to the rich anthocyanins in the berry skins. Generally it should come with a warning on the label. That warning should be; “Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate” your gums and cheeks shall never be the same.
    So it was with trepidation that I started tasting the 2009 Oliver’s Taranga Sagrantino. It is a dark red ruby colour. On the nose it has a dark berry fruit, roast meat, almost soy /savoury character. With a delightful floral earthiness. The intensity of the aroma has you preparing your tastebuds. It has good acid, with dark morello cherries. And again that smoky chacuterie. I found it both herbal and spicy – a combination of dusty fennel seed, cardamon, sort of Indian spice. Both interesting and complex. This is definitely a full bodied wine, with quite a warm alcohol hit despite being 13.5%. While the tannins are abundant and grippy, they are fine and powdery in texture. What it lacks a little in length, it makes up for in upfront intensity.
    I tasted this over several days to see how it would develop. The grippy mouthfeel does soften a little, and that spicy character becomes more meaty. During the tasting I was contemplating what to eat with this. It definitely requires food, a rich meaty ragu with smoky pancetta may be a good match. Or potentially even grilled venison marinated in red wine and juniper berries – if you’re game and love to play.

    Alcohol 13.5%
    RRP $40
    Closure: Screwcap
    Sample: Provided by producer

  • Rich & Lingering, Nov 2011

    Tuesday, November 22, 2011

    Hey Shiraz, Say Hello to My Little Friend!

     

    Lets face it, winemakers love to play. New techniques in the winery, new varieties in the vineyard, new oak forests. It all makes the industry grow and develop. One of our favourite winemakers in McLaren Vale who has a range of new varieties is Oliver’s Taranga. Amongst the ‘small batch’ wines winemaker Corrina Wright loves to play with, are a range of alternative varieties; Fiano, Vermantino, and Sagrantino. 

    Sagrantino is an Italian variety from Montefalco in Umbria and many of you may have heard of it, however very few have seen it in Australia. Sagrantino has great adaptability to wine regions with windy, dry zones, with a preference for clayey-flinty soils- a perfect match for McLaren Vale vineyards around Seaview subregion.

    Olivers Taranga Sagrantino

     

    Don and Margaret Oliver (5th Generation Olivers) travelled to Montefalco in 2006, after planting Sagrantino a year or so earlier. Apprehensively, they asked the locals their opinion on this variety and like all good Italians they answered to give this vine ‘time’ and have 'patience', reassuring them that they wouldn’t be disappointed with the wait.

     

    Sagrantino is well known for being a tannic wine, due to the rich anthocyanins in the berry skins. Generally it should come with a warning on the label. That warning should be; “Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate” your gums and cheeks shall never be the same.

     

    So it was with trepidation that I started tasting the 2009 Oliver’s Taranga Sagrantino. It is a dark red ruby colour. On the nose it has a dark berry fruit, roast meat, almost soy /savoury character. With a delightful floral earthiness. The intensity of the aroma has you preparing your tastebuds. It has good acid, with dark morello cherries. And again that smoky chacuterie. I found it both herbal and spicy – a combination of dusty fennel seed, cardamom, sort of Indian spice. Both interesting and complex. This is definitely a full bodied wine, with quite a warm alcohol hit despite being 13.5%. While the tannins are abundant and grippy, they are fine and powdery in texture. What it lacks a little in length, it makes up for in upfront intensity.
    I tasted this over several days to see how it would develop. The grippy mouthfeel does soften a little, and that spicy character becomes more meaty. During the tasting I was contemplating what to eat with this. It definitely requires food, a rich meaty ragu with smoky pancetta may be a good match. Or potentially even grilled venison marinated in red wine and juniper berries – if you’re game and love to play. 

    Alcohol 13.5%
    RRP $40
    Closure: Screwcap

     
  • Max Allen, Gourmet Traveller WINE, March 2011

    One of only a handful of locally grown sagrantinos and terrific example of the grape: typically regional dark, generous black fruit framed by tight, firm, lengthy tannins. Really stylish wine.

  • Campbell Mattinson, Big Red Wine Book 2011, 92+ Points

    With any luck, sagrantino will prove to have a great future in Australia. McLaren Vale – as with so many other ‘alternative varieties’ – seems to be taking the bull by the horns. Argument to say that McLaren Vale is Australia’s most progressive region.

     Hulking tannin. Rustic aroma and flavour. Tar and violets, ferrous elements and spice. Excellent intensity but if you’re tannin averse – one sip of this and you’ll run screaming from the room. Not sure how a wine like this will age under screwcap but it’ll be fascinating to revisit it in five, or even better ten, years. Fennel aftertaste. Rugged, but fascinating, wine.

  • Hearty Party @ The Adelaide Central Markets 2011

    Hearty Party @ Adelaide Central Markets

  • Mike Bennie, Gourmet Traveller WINE, Best of the Best 2011

    It’s duelling Italian varieties for McLaren Vale producers Coriole and Oliver’s Taranga. They’ve gone toe-to-toe with sagrantino releases and excelled with fiano (see below). Kindred spirit for alternative varieties, Mark Lloyd tenders experience to Corrina Wright’s keen eye and exuberance. The Coriole version is taut, gravelly and appropriately authentic with sour cherry, herbal inflections, then some fire and power in reserve. The Taranga sagrantino is wily, more seductive but still equally firm with blocky tannins and concentration at the fore. The variety teeters between these very serious versions and more youthful styles from producers Terra Felix, d’Arenberg and lesser knowns from the Granite Belt in Queensland, Preston Peak Wines. Well worth exploring for those seeking tannin fixes and additional masculinity in their wines.

  • 92 pts Jesse Lewis, The Good Drop, Nov 2010

    Cherry, roquette and licorice. The tannins take you by surprise with their super-astringency. I would describe them as a broad and wave-like, rather than grainy or powdery. It’s a challenging but ultimately rewarding wine which needs some real meaty food like braised beef cheeks. I was smiling the whole way through this one (with perhaps a slight grimace once the tannins hit). Mightily impressed. Bonus points for character here.

  • Closure

    Stelvin

    Grape Variety

    100% Sagrantino

    Growing Region

    100% McLaren Vale

    Colour

    Deep dark maroon.

    Aroma

    Lifted floral violet like notes, Christmas cake and earthy spice.

    Palate

    Quite a different palate structure to the varieties we are used to in Australia, this Sagrantino has beautiful floral tannins, loads of savoury fruit and a fresh acid line. Best enjoyed over a shared meal with friends.

    Alcohol%/Vol

    13.5%

    Winemaker

    Corrina Wright

    Date Bottled

    October 2010

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